Triple Crown Leadership

Triple Crown Leadership

Category Archives: Character

To Lead Well

Posted on

A poem by Bob Vanourek Summarizing Great Leadership “To Lead Well” by Bob Vanourek I’ll start within, Cultivating quality character, Acting with integrity, Listening with my heart, Composed amid chaos, A soul flooding forth with love. I’ll reach out, Caring and connecting, Serving, Engendering trust, Building relationships, Unleashing others who soar. I’ll step up, Saying “Yes,” Choosing wisely, Embracing change, Striving for what’s right, Pursuing our dreams. I’ll leave a legacy, A team of partners, Companions with courage and character, Leading and following, Creators of worthy deeds, Together undaunted. I wrote this poem at the urging of son, Gregg, who thought it would be a fitting close for my latest book, Leadership Wisdom: Lessons from Poetry, Prose, and Curious Verse. The poem traces the themes of the major sections of   …Continue Reading


10 Keys to Self-Leadership

Posted on

  We face a barrage of challenges these days: astonishing technological change, intense competition, a barrage of demands on our attention, tension between work and home, and more. There is one meta-skill that shapes how we respond to all these challenges: self-leadership. Without it, we cannot sustain ourselves for long. Leading self may be obvious, but it is far from easy. We neglect it at our peril. The task of leading self is the task of a lifetime. Here are ten keys to self-leadership: 1. Healthy Habits. Leadership is hard work: psychologically, emotionally, and even physically. Leading can be exhilarating and taxing at the same time. It can grind us down if we let it. When we are leading self well, we develop an energizing rhythm of self-care. It includes   …Continue Reading


The Trust Imperative

Posted on

By Bob Vanourek Building trust is an imperative to creating a better world. Through my work advocating ethical and values-based leadership, I sometimes see eyes glaze over. “Whose values?” people wonder. “How do you define what’s ethical?” “Can we really act morally in this rough-and-tumble world?” Fair questions from people trying to survive in a tough, competitive environment. While many of us struggle with what ethics and values mean, almost everyone understands trust. Why? Because we experience it daily in good or bad forms at home and work. We trust our spouse, our children, our colleagues; or we don’t. We have seen and experienced the warm feelings of a trusting relationship; or felt the heartbreak and loss of trust broken. An organization to which I belong, Trust Across America–Trust Around   …Continue Reading


52 Trust-Building Ideas

Posted on

Want 52 great ideas for how to build trust in your organization? The annual Edelman survey reveals that less than 20% of business and government leaders are trusted to tell the truth, or that they make moral and ethical decisions. See their 2013 data below. Survey Respondents Distrust Our Leaders Such lack of trust is devastating. Trust Across America–Trust Around the World asked their worldwide experts for their ideas on trust building and designed a powerful wall poster: “52 Ideas that You Can Implement to Build Trust” Contributors include such luminaries as Jim Kouzes, Barry Posner, Barbara Brooks Kimmel, Doug Conant, Stephen M. R. Covey, Bill George, and many more. (I’m proud to have three ideas listed.) This wall poster sells for $7, but I’ll send a pdf of it   …Continue Reading


A Leadership Lightning Bolt

Posted on

by Bob Vanourek Early in my leadership quest to “find a better way to lead,” I had the wonderful pleasure to work for Jan and Olga Erteszak, Polish immigrants who had fled the Nazis in Europe and then founded a ladies’ lingerie company in Los Angeles. The Olga Company was the creative leader in this industry, designing and producing fashionable lingerie, sleepwear, and loungewear. I learned so much about creativity from Jan and Olga because we literally practiced creativity in meetings. What fun as we stretched our imaginations. One memorable day, Jan, with a wink and that crooked smile of his, gave me some pamphlets to read written by Robert Greenleaf. Knowing my burning interest in leadership, Jan quipped, “I think you’ll find these interesting.” The message was ages old   …Continue Reading


Why Do You Want to Lead?

Posted on

By Bob Vanourek I was flying from Cleveland to Chicago to meet my wife, June, and two young sons. They were flying from Los Angeles to meet me for a brief Christmas holiday. I had been “too busy” to fly back to help her cope with our toddler and the baby. (It is really so embarrassing to relate this story now.) I was 29 years old and working nightmare hours for a high-flying firm that was rapidly acquiring companies. My job was to fly out and spend all week, every week, “integrating” the acquired firms. “Integrating” meant consolidating their plants, cutting duplicate costs, and often firing their founders. The look of disbelief on those entrepreneurs’ faces when they were terminated just broke my heart. In Chicago my wife asked me,   …Continue Reading


A Treasure of Wisdom

Posted on

 “A Treasure of Wisdom” By Bob Vanourek   Every now and then, I have a chance to read a book a colleague has written and want to tell others about it. Such it is with Frank Sonnenberg’s Follow Your Conscience: Make a Difference in Your Life and the Lives of Others.   Frank is an award-winning author and a consultant who works in the areas of leadership, character, values, and personal responsibility. I met Frank electronically through my association with Trust Across America–Trust Around the World.   This book is a real gem and is rich with sage advice. I have many pages dog-eared and passages highlighted. Frank covers topics like the power of kindness, forgiveness, and believing; the magic of giving; the most important things to teach your children;   …Continue Reading


The Good News About Leadership

Posted on

  “For myself I am an optimist – it does not seem to be much use to be anything else.” -Winston Churchill   With all the leadership scandals and breakdowns in virtually every segment of society bombarding us day-in and day-out, it is easy to become cynical about our leaders today. Yet we’re cautiously optimistic despite the massive challenges we face.   Leaders acknowledge reality, and we don’t avoid the disheartening, even outrageous, leadership failures we come across. (You don’t need another list of them, do you?)   “You must maintain unwavering faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality,”   -Jim Collins, in Good to Great,   …Continue Reading


Take Fear Along For The Ride

Posted on

“I have learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, But he who conquers that fear.” -Nelson Mandela Years ago in Dallas, Bob attended a presentation on courage that made a lifelong impact on him. He expected to hear some inspiring words about famous people, or perhaps acts of heroism by first responders or soldiers in battle. Instead, the speaker was an older woman who simply told the audience her story. She had been happily married and was in business with her husband. Everything seemed to be going well until one day when her world fell apart. Her husband came home and, with no prior warning, announced he wanted a divorce because he   …Continue Reading


Culture as a Competitive Advantage

Posted on

“Culture isn’t just one aspect of the game—it is the game.” Lou Gerstner, former CEO of IBM How can your organization gain a sustainable competitive advantage? Technological breakthrough? Killer patents? Brilliant strategy? Protected regulatory position? We suggest another, perhaps even more powerful, way: create a high-performance culture of character Create a culture intent on building an excellent, ethical, and enduring organization, much like the mythical Knights of King Arthur’s Round Table enjoyed. Technologies become obsolete; patents expire; regulations will change. A High-Performance Culture of Character We think of organizational culture as “how we do things here”—how people behave. Culture forms over time and drives what happens when the authorities are not present. It sets the tone for the organization, and the norms for what is acceptable behavior from people in   …Continue Reading