Triple Crown Leadership

Triple Crown Leadership

Category Archives: Leadership

The Keys to Great Meetings

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by Bob Vanourek Photo credit: iStock One of the mind-numbing miseries of organizational work is the time spent in meetings. Atlassian, an Australian enterprise software company, provides the following estimates from various sources: Most employees attend 62 meetings/month (staggering) and half the meetings are considered time wasted Regarding the average meeting attendee: 91% have daydreamed during meetings 39% have slept during meetings 45% felt overwhelmed by the number of meetings attended 73% did other work during meetings 47% felt that meetings were their #1 time wasters at the office I’m sure you have felt the tedious waste of time and money as some pointless meetings drone on with people off on tangents while others are tuned out. I’ve had more than my fair share of miserable meetings too, so here   …Continue Reading


CHRO–Become Your Organization’s Chief Culture Officer

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Today’s Human Resources (HR) leader has a wonderful opportunity to make an important strategic contribution: Become your organization’s Chief Culture Officer. If your CEO already acts as the Chief Culture Officer, great. Then you can be his or her Chief Culture Execution Officer. But most CHROs aren’t that fortunate, and you may need some ammunition to persuade the CEO that focusing on building culture can be a source of competitive advantage: Researchers have found a “strong relationship between constructive organizational cultures and financial performance.” (Source: Eric Sanders and Robert Cooke, “Financial Returns from Organizational Culture Improvement: Translating ‘Soft’ Changes into ‘Hard’ Dollars,” Human Synergistics White Paper, 2011.) According to a Booz & Company report, “Culture matters, enormously. Studies have shown again and again that there may be no more critical   …Continue Reading


Leading without Authority

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Leadership is a complicated subject. Most everyone recognizes good leadership, but there are many varying definitions of leadership, as well as many different versions of what constitutes good leadership. Unfortunately, most examples of good leadership also cite people who are in positions of authority. Such authority gives people hierarchical power to enforce their views, or entices people under the authority leader to just acquiesce to the leader’s initiatives. But what happens when you are in an organization where you don’t have authority? How do you lead from below to people above you in the hierarchy? How do you lead among your peers with no authority over them either? As most good leaders have learned, before you can presume to lead others, you must first lead yourself well. If you don’t   …Continue Reading


Personal Resilience and Self-Care in Hard Times

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In times of great upheaval and uncertainty, we struggle to find ways to thrive despite the challenges. Much of this comes down to self-talk, self-regulation, and self-leadership—navigating our reactions to external events and ensuring that our inner voice does not undermine us amidst the difficulties. The toll of the pandemic is massive, from disease, suffering, death, and mourning to unemployment, financial stress, disruptions, and restrictions. The effects on our quality of life and inner state can be more profound than we realize. Stress, pressure, and fear—for ourselves and our loved ones—exact their price in insidious ways. But we humans are strong and adaptable, with amazing capabilities—both individually and collectively. Two of our most precious assets in times like these are personal resilience and self-care. Resilience. What is resilience? Tony Schwartz,   …Continue Reading


Leading in a Crisis

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Today, we are all being tested greatly, and so it is with our leaders. Individuals, organizations, and systems are all under strain, with some facing overload. Here are several keys to leading well in a crisis. Radical Focus. When you are in a crisis, your immediate priority is survival. Crises require take fierce discipline in personal and organizational time management. Leaders should expect to use more “steel” (hard-edged leadership) than “velvet” (soft-edged) at the outset. In a crisis, leaders must mercilessly cast aside all manner of ideas and projects—some with real merit—to ensure a tight focus on one or two key priorities needed for survival. Other priorities must wait. Even with this radical focus, leaders should look beyond the current storm, seeking creative ways to position the organization or group   …Continue Reading


The Perils of Climbing Mode in Our Career

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In our culture today, it is easy to assume that the proper frame for going about our working life is to pursue “climbing mode” as early and aggressively as possible. When I say “climbing mode,” I mean striving to move up the ladder of success, focusing on achievement and advancement. For many, this notion is so ensconced in our culture that it is invisible, unconscious, and wholly taken for granted. But is it right? Is it helpful or harmful when it comes to living a good life and crafting good work? The assumption of course is that it is right and helpful, that by focusing on “climbing mode” one will build a financial foundation that will lead to success, freedom, and happiness. No doubt there can be great value in   …Continue Reading


Ten Keys to Self-Leadership

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We face a barrage of challenges these days: rapid change, a barrage of demands on our attention, tension between work and home, and more. There is one meta-skill that shapes how we respond to all these challenges: self-leadership. Without it, we cannot sustain ourselves for long. Leading self may be obvious, but it is far from easy. We neglect it at our peril. The task of leading self is the task of a lifetime. Here are ten keys to self-leadership: … To read the full blog on Gregg Vanourek’s web site, click here.


The Essence of Entrepreneurship

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Entrepreneurs today have a powerful hold on the collective imagination. Look around and notice the many inspiring examples of entrepreneurs in action. But much of what we think we know about entrepreneurship is wrong. What is the essence of entrepreneurship? It turns out that the word “entrepreneurship” has a fascinating history that is actually useful to understanding its essence. Let’s take a quick tour of that history, but starting in the present and working backward. Elaine Rideout of North Carolina State University defines entrepreneurs as those who “creatively initiate, evaluate, and organize to exploit wealth creating business opportunities under conditions of uncertainty.” Her definition packs a lot of punch and includes many of the things we typically think of when reflecting on entrepreneurs. Richard P. Rumelt of UCLA in 1987   …Continue Reading


How to Change Your Organizational Culture

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Most leaders understand that organizational culture is important. But many struggle with how to change and improve their culture. For too many leaders, culture is too ethereal, too hard to measure, too intangible. So, they muddle along with speeches, slogans, or projects, but their organizational culture refuses to budge. That’s unfortunate because your ideal culture can be created. Culture is the legacy of leadership. In our book, Triple Crown Leadership, we defined organizational culture simply as “how we do things here”—how people behave. We said, “Culture forms over time and drives what happens when the authorities are not present. It sets the tone for the organization and the norms for what is acceptable to the group. Culture is a powerful force in determining how an organization operates.” Lou Gerstner, after   …Continue Reading


Is Your Business Stuck in Zombieland?

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by Bob Vanourek “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Attributed to Albert Einstein U.S. government statistics tell us that about half of all new businesses will be gone within five years. Of course, some businesses become successful, often within a few years. These are the models all entrepreneurs hope to emulate. My guess is these stars are likely less than 10% of all new businesses. If I’m right in my conservative guess, about 40% of all new businesses may be stuck in what I’ll call “Zombieland.” Zombieland businesses are half alive and half dead. Their owners and managers often work crazy hours, sometimes milking their life savings and retirement accounts to keep them afloat, even re-mortgaging their homes and signing personal bank-loan   …Continue Reading


To Lead Well

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A poem by Bob Vanourek Summarizing Great Leadership “To Lead Well” by Bob Vanourek I’ll start within, Cultivating quality character, Acting with integrity, Listening with my heart, Composed amid chaos, A soul flooding forth with love. I’ll reach out, Caring and connecting, Serving, Engendering trust, Building relationships, Unleashing others who soar. I’ll step up, Saying “Yes,” Choosing wisely, Embracing change, Striving for what’s right, Pursuing our dreams. I’ll leave a legacy, A team of partners, Companions with courage and character, Leading and following, Creators of worthy deeds, Together undaunted. I wrote this poem at the urging of son, Gregg, who thought it would be a fitting close for my latest book, Leadership Wisdom: Lessons from Poetry, Prose, and Curious Verse. The poem traces the themes of the major sections of   …Continue Reading


Does Your Business Need an Advisory Board?

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“I was not sure where I was going … But you saw further and clearer than I, … to a place I had never dreamed of …” -Thomas Merton The sad reality is that most businesses fail. The quoted failure rates vary, but they are all dismal. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says, “About half of all new establishments survive five years or more and about one-third survive 10 years or more.”  Many other businesses underperform pitiably. The primary reasons most businesses fail have been summarized this way: •    Poor leadership, management, planning, location, financial or asset management, partners, or •    Lack of focus, capital, customer focus, differentiation, succession, and more Most of these reasons can be traced back to the CEO. He or she lacked the perspectives, insights,   …Continue Reading


10 Keys to Self-Leadership

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  We face a barrage of challenges these days: astonishing technological change, intense competition, a barrage of demands on our attention, tension between work and home, and more. There is one meta-skill that shapes how we respond to all these challenges: self-leadership. Without it, we cannot sustain ourselves for long. Leading self may be obvious, but it is far from easy. We neglect it at our peril. The task of leading self is the task of a lifetime. Here are ten keys to self-leadership: 1. Healthy Habits. Leadership is hard work: psychologically, emotionally, and even physically. Leading can be exhilarating and taxing at the same time. It can grind us down if we let it. When we are leading self well, we develop an energizing rhythm of self-care. It includes   …Continue Reading


The Trust Imperative

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By Bob Vanourek Building trust is an imperative to creating a better world. Through my work advocating ethical and values-based leadership, I sometimes see eyes glaze over. “Whose values?” people wonder. “How do you define what’s ethical?” “Can we really act morally in this rough-and-tumble world?” Fair questions from people trying to survive in a tough, competitive environment. While many of us struggle with what ethics and values mean, almost everyone understands trust. Why? Because we experience it daily in good or bad forms at home and work. We trust our spouse, our children, our colleagues; or we don’t. We have seen and experienced the warm feelings of a trusting relationship; or felt the heartbreak and loss of trust broken. An organization to which I belong, Trust Across America–Trust Around   …Continue Reading


Ethical Leadership–Your Game Changer

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by Bob Vanourek Embracing ethical leadership can be a game changer in your life, as it was for me. But just what is ethical leadership? And how does ethical leadership differ from ordinary leadership and management? Management involves planning, budgeting, and administering. Management watches the bottom line of the organization, focusing on, for example, profitability for a business. Management has a problem-solving focus, organizing groups, staffing them, and largely directing and controlling people, often defining boundaries for people. In management, relationships are based on one’s position power, title, and authority. Management is task-oriented, often telling people what to do or not do. The work is transactional: “You do this for me, and I’ll do that for you.” Management aligns people through policies, procedures, and systems using good “head skills” and   …Continue Reading


Interviewing for Emotional Intelligence

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  In our award-winning book, Triple Crown Leadership, we reveal five advanced leadership practices for building an excellent, ethical, and enduring organization. The first of these is to recruit, develop, and promote people for both “head and heart.” Head involves the education, knowledge, skills, technical competence, and experience necessary for the work. Heart involves integrity, emotional intelligence, and fit with the desired culture of the organization. Some leaders struggle with how to probe for heart qualities in interviews. In chapter 2 of Triple Crown Leadership, we list some questions that can be used to discover heart qualities in candidates. They are also available here: Interviewing for Heart. Recently, Harvey Deutschendorf, an emotional intelligence expert, author, and speaker, published a good article in Fast Company on “7 Interview Questions for Measuring   …Continue Reading


New Website and Book Release

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In conjunction with announcing his newest book, Bob has launched a new website. If you are interested in following Bob’s work, sign up here: http://www.bobvanourek.com Bob’s newest book, Leadership Wisdom: Lessons from Poetry, Prose, and Curious Verse, will be released by Motivational Press on May 3, 2016. The book is a compendium of timeless, inspiring wisdom on leadership from the sages of literature and outstanding leaders written over the centuries right up to the present day. Bob has selected over 70 poems, prose, or speech passages, each with an insightful leadership message. He combines these pearls with engaging commentary from his own vast leadership experience and closes each entry with practical applications that each reader can use immediately. You will hear from an astonishing array of poets, presidents, activists, soldiers,   …Continue Reading


52 Trust-Building Ideas

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Want 52 great ideas for how to build trust in your organization? The annual Edelman survey reveals that less than 20% of business and government leaders are trusted to tell the truth, or that they make moral and ethical decisions. See their 2013 data below. Survey Respondents Distrust Our Leaders Such lack of trust is devastating. Trust Across America–Trust Around the World asked their worldwide experts for their ideas on trust building and designed a powerful wall poster: “52 Ideas that You Can Implement to Build Trust” Contributors include such luminaries as Jim Kouzes, Barry Posner, Barbara Brooks Kimmel, Doug Conant, Stephen M. R. Covey, Bill George, and many more. (I’m proud to have three ideas listed.) This wall poster sells for $7, but I’ll send a pdf of it   …Continue Reading


Boards and Trust

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by Bob Vanourek Higher trust in organizations leads to higher retention, cooperation, innovation, and pride. Higher trust enhances the speed at which organizations work because the fear created in low trust organizations is minimized. Higher trust leads to better results for all stakeholders from customers to employees and shareholders. Therefore, higher trust needs to be on the agenda of boards of directors. Yes, I know they’re busy with risk mitigation, regulatory compliance, governance, financial oversight, and more. But if the board does not insist on a high-performance culture built on trust with all stakeholders, then that board is abdicating their fundamental fiduciary responsibility. For several years, I have been working with Trust Across America – Trust Around the World (TAA – TAW) on how organizations can increase trust within their   …Continue Reading


Helping People Soar

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by Bob Vanourek In 1981 I joined Monarch Marking Systems as their president. This subsidiary of Pitney Bowes was the leader in price-marking equipment used by retailers. But scannable bar codes had just come out, so price-marking equipment might become obsolete. I was stoked by this strategic challenge! Monarch had wisely reinvented itself as a bar code printer company and had just introduced a clunky machine the size of a small desk. It was a disaster. The next logical step was to develop a tabletop version, but Monarch’s visionary VP of Research & Development, Bud Klein, suggested we develop the world’s first hand-held bar code printer. The development cycle for such a leapfrog product was three years. Bud proposed we radically empower a cross-functional team of volunteers to launch this   …Continue Reading


A Leadership Lightning Bolt

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by Bob Vanourek Early in my leadership quest to “find a better way to lead,” I had the wonderful pleasure to work for Jan and Olga Erteszak, Polish immigrants who had fled the Nazis in Europe and then founded a ladies’ lingerie company in Los Angeles. The Olga Company was the creative leader in this industry, designing and producing fashionable lingerie, sleepwear, and loungewear. I learned so much about creativity from Jan and Olga because we literally practiced creativity in meetings. What fun as we stretched our imaginations. One memorable day, Jan, with a wink and that crooked smile of his, gave me some pamphlets to read written by Robert Greenleaf. Knowing my burning interest in leadership, Jan quipped, “I think you’ll find these interesting.” The message was ages old   …Continue Reading


Why Do You Want to Lead?

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By Bob Vanourek I was flying from Cleveland to Chicago to meet my wife, June, and two young sons. They were flying from Los Angeles to meet me for a brief Christmas holiday. I had been “too busy” to fly back to help her cope with our toddler and the baby. (It is really so embarrassing to relate this story now.) I was 29 years old and working nightmare hours for a high-flying firm that was rapidly acquiring companies. My job was to fly out and spend all week, every week, “integrating” the acquired firms. “Integrating” meant consolidating their plants, cutting duplicate costs, and often firing their founders. The look of disbelief on those entrepreneurs’ faces when they were terminated just broke my heart. In Chicago my wife asked me,   …Continue Reading


Escaping the Stressors of Leadership

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  Guest Post by Mike Figliuolo   The pressure on leaders is increasing every day. Calls for “doing more with less” echo through the halls as ever-escalating expectations create a great deal of stress for leaders. The investment of a leader’s time, energy, and attention (what we call “leadership capital”) is a critical choice leaders make every day. The options for delivering on these heightened expectations are limited. Sure, leaders can step on the proverbial gas pedal and work harder and longer, but play that game too long and the stress will add up. The cumulative effects of these stressors can be devastating. When leaders overwork themselves, their teams tend to do the same. People stay at the office until the boss leaves; their stress levels are correlated with those   …Continue Reading


A Triple Crown Winner at Last

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That’s why it’s called “the most elusive championship in all of sports.” It’s taken 37 years since Affirmed won the coveted Triple Crown of thoroughbred horseracing in 1978 for another winner to break through. On June 6 American Pharoah (an inadvertent misspelling of “pharaoh”) became only the 12th horse since 1875 to win the Triple Crown. The bay colt ran wire-to-wire in the lead in perfect weather before 90,000 raucous fans at Belmont Park to win by 5 ½ lengths. After winning the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness, all within the last five weeks, American Pharoah wore earplugs to muffle the distracting noise. All the other seven entries in the 2015 (and 147th running of the) Belmont Stakes had skipped the Preakness three weeks earlier to rest. Many racing experts   …Continue Reading


The Problem with Tired Leaders

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Are you tired? Stressed? Busy? Just par for the course for today’s leader, right? Wrong. These days, it seems that “busy is the new black.” Busy is in. People boast about how busy they are. When answering a schedule request, they regale you with all the things in their calendar that prevent them from meeting you at the requested time. It’s a game, with busyness an assumed proxy for importance. Anne-Marie Slaughter has described modern workers as “time macho,” with “relentless competition to work harder, stay later,” and travel more. Thus the recent viral meme: “Stop the glorification of busy.”   It turns out that being tired is a terrible formula for leading and living. And it’s worse that you might think. Recall that sleep deprivation is one of the   …Continue Reading


Learning and Development Impacting Your Bottom Line

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Learning and Development Impacting Your Bottom Line Guest post by Rachel Kay   Image: ShutterStock   One of the biggest challenges you face as a leader when attempting to implement a learning and development (L&D) initiative within your company is convincing the decision-makers that it will benefit the company as a whole. When they can’t see a clear projected return on their investment, they may balk at backing you, so it’s your job to assure them that it’s not going to be a waste of time, money, and resources; in other words, you must have their trust. According to the Thales Learning & Development guide that focuses on this subject, L&D should “impact your bottom line and help your business move in the direction you want.” Otherwise, what’s the point? Aligning   …Continue Reading


6 Ingenious Ideas for Elevating Employee Productivity

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6 Ingenious Ideas for Elevating Employee Productivity Guest blog by Karleia Steiner   image source: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/   Elevating employee productivity can seem like a daunting and difficult task; however, creating a work environment that keeps employees working at their maximum potential can be achieved by simply shifting your frame of mind. 1. Listen to Your Employees Listening is one of the hardest skills any manager, employee or person can master. Listening doesn’t just involve the time you spend talking to someone, but it also includes subtle cues you might not pick up at first. Do your employees seem frustrated or happy in their emails? Do they respond well to policy changes? Ask your employees what they need from you to do their jobs more effectively. 2. Give Positive Feedback When   …Continue Reading


A Treasure of Wisdom

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 “A Treasure of Wisdom” By Bob Vanourek   Every now and then, I have a chance to read a book a colleague has written and want to tell others about it. Such it is with Frank Sonnenberg’s Follow Your Conscience: Make a Difference in Your Life and the Lives of Others.   Frank is an award-winning author and a consultant who works in the areas of leadership, character, values, and personal responsibility. I met Frank electronically through my association with Trust Across America–Trust Around the World.   This book is a real gem and is rich with sage advice. I have many pages dog-eared and passages highlighted. Frank covers topics like the power of kindness, forgiveness, and believing; the magic of giving; the most important things to teach your children;   …Continue Reading


Blue Ocean Trust Building Workshop

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“Blue Ocean” Trust-Building Workshop (This Takes Guts) By Bob Vanourek   Building trust requires courage: the courage to be vulnerable, to listen to feedback on what you, as a leader, do daily, and the resolve to follow through on your commitments to change, even if those changes are uncomfortable.   This trust-building activity takes guts because it opens you to feedback you may not have heard before. It’s uncomfortable. This workshop, which I have used successfully, is a much shorter version of the excellent process described in the Harvard Business Review article “Blue Ocean Leadership” by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne.[1]   This activity can be used in (1) large organizations that have several layers of management and several departments (or functional “silos”), or (2) individual departments. The workshop   …Continue Reading


Merger Problems

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  Our friend and colleague, Bob Whipple, “The Trust Ambassador,” recently posted this blog on “Merger Problems” that we’d like to share with you. Bob’s most recent book, Trust in Transition: Navigating Organizational Change, deals with this subject in wonderful depth.  


New to the Boardroom? How to Succeed

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image credit: Bigstock By Bob Vanourek   Congratulations. You’ve just been invited to join your first public company board. Great. Now, what can you expect? It’s not just approving the CEO’s strategy or officer compensation recommendations after asking a few questions. It’s more than risk assessments, financial statement reviews, and meeting with the outside auditors periodically. It’s much deeper and more complex, especially if you want to bring a new brand of leadership to the boardroom. You will be confronted with difficult challenges you are not likely to have faced before. What do you do? When do you lead assertively? When do you lead softly? When do you follow? Who do you talk to for advice? How do you succeed? Based on years of experience with many corporate boards as a   …Continue Reading


The Ethical Challenges Faced by Leaders

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  Image credit: Public Domain  “Divorced from ethics, leadership is reduced to management and politics to mere technique.” -James MacGregor Burns We all face ethical challenges and dilemmas, and all the more so if we lead. Think how you would act in the following scenarios: You give the cashier a $10 bill, and she gives you change for a $20. You realize it in the parking lot. Do you trudge back and give her the money? You incur some personal charges on a business trip. Do you fudge some expenses to help cover these costs? Do you overestimate your charitable contributions on your tax form to minimize your reported profit and taxes. Your boss asks you to cover for him with some false excuse while he is absent from work   …Continue Reading


The Good News About Leadership

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  “For myself I am an optimist – it does not seem to be much use to be anything else.” -Winston Churchill   With all the leadership scandals and breakdowns in virtually every segment of society bombarding us day-in and day-out, it is easy to become cynical about our leaders today. Yet we’re cautiously optimistic despite the massive challenges we face.   Leaders acknowledge reality, and we don’t avoid the disheartening, even outrageous, leadership failures we come across. (You don’t need another list of them, do you?)   “You must maintain unwavering faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality,”   -Jim Collins, in Good to Great,   …Continue Reading


Leadership Vision

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This week we bring you profound advice from a trusted colleague and friend, Robert Whipple, CEO of Leadergrow Incorporated.  His recent post really drove home for us, and we wanted to share it with you.  It gives 8 actionable items which will help improve your vision as a leader, and help you improve the vision of other leaders.   Improving the Vision of Leaders by Robert Whipple   Enjoy!


Double Your Productivity in 15 Minutes

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Guest Blog by Dan Forbes, Founder of the Lead With Giants™ Community In the early 1900s Charles Schwab was president of Bethlehem Steel, a small, struggling company. He was looking for ways to increase productivity and profits. In walked Ivy Lee.  He was a business consultant and promised Schwab that in just fifteen minutes he could share a secret with the company’s managers that would double productivity. The skeptical Schwab asked Lee what he was selling and at what price? Lee told him to just try it for six months and then, “You can pay me what you think it’s worth.” Here’s the secret Lee shared with the managers: Every night, at the end of each day, write down the six most important things that need to get done the next day.   …Continue Reading


Take Fear Along For The Ride

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“I have learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, But he who conquers that fear.” -Nelson Mandela Years ago in Dallas, Bob attended a presentation on courage that made a lifelong impact on him. He expected to hear some inspiring words about famous people, or perhaps acts of heroism by first responders or soldiers in battle. Instead, the speaker was an older woman who simply told the audience her story. She had been happily married and was in business with her husband. Everything seemed to be going well until one day when her world fell apart. Her husband came home and, with no prior warning, announced he wanted a divorce because he   …Continue Reading


The Power of a Team Charter

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  In case you missed our article on the importance of written charters for special action teams in CoBiz Magazine this summer, we are sharing a slightly edited excerpt, along with a link to our written charter template, in this week’s blog post. Whether to attack a problem, exploit an opportunity, or achieve a philanthropic goal, setting up special teams and committees can be very effective. These special action teams form for a defined period, ranging from a few days to months or longer. They normally have a small number of team members, such as five or seven. Their participants may work full- or part-time for the team. These teams accomplish their mission and then disband, only to see other special action teams formed and disbanded when their mission is complete. In addition to other advantages,   …Continue Reading


Governance Guidelines for Corporate Boards

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   Image credit: iStock “If you have leadership without governance,  you risk tyranny, fraud and personal fiefdoms. If you have governance without leadership,  you risk atrophy, bureaucracy and indifference.” – Mark Goyder, Founder Director, Tomorrow’s Company   With so many corporate scandals in recent decades, much focus has been placed on upgrading corporate governance practices, and rightly so. In my (Bob’s) experience, most large corporations have given careful thought to their governance guidelines. Google, a firm we admire (see “Snapshots” on pages 238-242 of Triple Crown Leadership), has a nice set of governance guidelines. IBM has a nice set too. But most smaller and mid-sized corporations need some additional guidance in this area. (Perhaps some of the larger firms would appreciate some fresh thinking too?) Consequently, I created an Outline   …Continue Reading


The Dangers of Toxic Micro-Cultures

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Image credit: Painting by Leah Saulnier www.paintingmaniac.com   Does your organization have some toxic micro-cultures? If so, you ignore them at your peril. Much is written these days about the importance of culture in boosting an organization’s success. Strategy is important, as are talent, business models, innovation, and more. But culture, “how we do things here,” as we like to define it, can be the trump card, because it permeates everything in an organization. Culture is what people do when the boss is not around. Wise leaders craft the culture purposefully and make the desired behaviors explicit and clear. Culture can have a big impact on whether people act ethically, honorably, and responsibly. For example, when direct supervisors were observed to behave unethically: 42% of employees felt pressure to behave   …Continue Reading


Learning to Trust Your Judgment

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This blog was previously published by Trust Across America – Trust Around the World as a part of their 100 Days of Organizational Trust program. We hope you will enjoy this blog and also visit their website for more great blogs and other insights on trust. Many folks are reluctant to trust their own judgment. They may feel they should not speak up when some alarm bell is going off in their head for a variety of reasons: “It’s not my job to speak up.” “I’m not in a position of leadership or authority.” “I’m not smart enough on this topic.” “I don’t have the experience needed to speak up.” All these blocks are normal, but we need to learn to trust our own judgment and speak up when it is essential   …Continue Reading


Why Boards Should Pay Attention to Corporate Culture

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“Culture isn’t just one aspect of the game—it is the game.” Lou Gerstner, former IBM CEO   Most boards think “culture” is the soft, fuzzy stuff that some CEO’s or HR leaders may pay attention to. These boards are sadly wrong. A high-performing, ethical culture can be a great source of competitive advantage. An organization’s culture is “how we do things here”—how people behave in their relationships. Business is a set of relationships, and healthy relationships are built in trust. Organizations with a toxic culture pay a heavy price in lost revenue, damaged reputation, lawsuits, and more. By contrast, organizations with a high-performance, trust-based culture (e.g., Southwest Airlines, Zappos.com, and Patagonia) enjoy a self-reinforcing, virtuous cycle with their stakeholders. They build trust and employees unleash more of their talents and   …Continue Reading


Trust in Transition: Navigating Organizational Change

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Our friend and colleague, Bob Whipple, the Trust Ambassador and CEO of Leadergrow, has written an important new book, Trust in Transition: Navigating Organizational Change. Here’s a review of it I posted on Amazon.com: “Priceless and Practical. Don’t embark upon an organizational change effort before reading this book.   Bob Whipple, the Trust Ambassador, has written an important book. During my years leading organizations in extreme transitions, I wish I had had Bob’s book with me. Transitions, such as mergers, often fail or operate sub-optimally due to cultural issues, frequently because the parties involved lack trust in one another. Bob outlines steps leaders can take when embarking upon organizational change to mitigate the risks and avoid the pitfalls. Especially useful are his Figures and Tables, illustrating clearly the barriers to navigating   …Continue Reading