Triple Crown Leadership

Triple Crown Leadership

Tag Archives: Motivational Speaker

Double Your Productivity in 15 Minutes

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Guest Blog by Dan Forbes, Founder of the Lead With Giants™ Community In the early 1900s Charles Schwab was president of Bethlehem Steel, a small, struggling company. He was looking for ways to increase productivity and profits. In walked Ivy Lee.  He was a business consultant and promised Schwab that in just fifteen minutes he could share a secret with the company’s managers that would double productivity. The skeptical Schwab asked Lee what he was selling and at what price? Lee told him to just try it for six months and then, “You can pay me what you think it’s worth.” Here’s the secret Lee shared with the managers: Every night, at the end of each day, write down the six most important things that need to get done the next day.   …Continue Reading


Why Boards Should Pay Attention to Corporate Culture

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“Culture isn’t just one aspect of the game—it is the game.” Lou Gerstner, former IBM CEO   Most boards think “culture” is the soft, fuzzy stuff that some CEO’s or HR leaders may pay attention to. These boards are sadly wrong. A high-performing, ethical culture can be a great source of competitive advantage. An organization’s culture is “how we do things here”—how people behave in their relationships. Business is a set of relationships, and healthy relationships are built in trust. Organizations with a toxic culture pay a heavy price in lost revenue, damaged reputation, lawsuits, and more. By contrast, organizations with a high-performance, trust-based culture (e.g., Southwest Airlines, Zappos.com, and Patagonia) enjoy a self-reinforcing, virtuous cycle with their stakeholders. They build trust and employees unleash more of their talents and   …Continue Reading


Trust in Transition: Navigating Organizational Change

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Our friend and colleague, Bob Whipple, the Trust Ambassador and CEO of Leadergrow, has written an important new book, Trust in Transition: Navigating Organizational Change. Here’s a review of it I posted on Amazon.com: “Priceless and Practical. Don’t embark upon an organizational change effort before reading this book.   Bob Whipple, the Trust Ambassador, has written an important book. During my years leading organizations in extreme transitions, I wish I had had Bob’s book with me. Transitions, such as mergers, often fail or operate sub-optimally due to cultural issues, frequently because the parties involved lack trust in one another. Bob outlines steps leaders can take when embarking upon organizational change to mitigate the risks and avoid the pitfalls. Especially useful are his Figures and Tables, illustrating clearly the barriers to navigating   …Continue Reading


CEO Tip: Trust Your Board As Your Ally

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  Some CEO’s and boards have close, trusting partnerships that serve them and their firms extremely well. They are, in my experience, the minority. Most CEO’s I have met see the board as a group they need to “manage,” a dinner and meeting they need to prepare for, taking preciously valuable time away from running the business, which is the CEO’s real job. To many CEO’s, the board is tolerated, professionally and courteously of course, but a group relatively uninformed about how hard it is to really run the business. The time spent preparing for board meetings is huge. Staff reports prepared; rehearsals of PowerPoint presentations; after-meeting meetings to decipher what the board now wants and what to do to get ready for the next session. What’s the solution? A   …Continue Reading


A New, Overarching Goal for Boards

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One of the painful results of boards embracing the goal to “maximize shareholder value” is shown in the Edelman Trust Barometer: Only 53% of respondents trust business Only 18% of the general population trust business leaders to tell the truth The overarching goal for corporate boards should not be to maximize shareholder value. Instead, boards should set as their primary objective to: Build an excellent, ethical, and enduring organization. Excellent means achieving extraordinary results for customers, employees, and shareholders. Ethical means achieving those results the right way, with integrity, not cutting ethical corners. Enduring means achieving those results sustainably, being conscious of the firm’s impact on the planet, and acting responsibly to ensure precious resources are not wasted. Enduring also means acting sustainably inside the firm, not burning people out, nor   …Continue Reading


Leadership Lessons from The Lord of the Rings

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J.R.R. Tolkien in military uniform, 1916. Image: public domain Leaders Venture into the Unknown “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.” Bilbo Baggins Leaders Step Up “I will take the Ring,” Frodo said, “though I do not know the way.” The Burdens of Leadership  Frodo: “I wish the Ring had never come to me. I wish none of this had happened.” Gandalf: “So do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.” Leaders Undertake Great Challenges “This is the hour of the   …Continue Reading


Do Your C-Suite Execs See Value in People?

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Some C-suite execs see themselves as wonderful gifts to their firm. After all, they have all the right tickets punched: the right schools, an accomplished track record, and charisma. These are the execs with the right clothes, cars, and houses. They enjoy their generous compensation and perks. They convey a message of: “It’s good to be great” with willing followers hoping some day they can reach such lofty heights. The fatal problem is these “great ones” can’t possibly cope with the complexity and hyper-fast pace of today’s world. No matter how smart they are, no matter how many hours they work, no matter what new innovations they embrace, they can’t do it alone. They need the depth and breadth of ideas and heartfelt implementation from many people inside and outside   …Continue Reading


Transparency Builds Trust

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iStock Photo Let’s consider two otherwise identical firms. Rocket Corp. issues their quarterly earnings press results, focusing on their financial results. Then they conduct their quarterly conference call with investors, reporting their revenue, margins, profitability, cash levels, and citing their revenue and earnings guidance for the next quarter and year. They take questions from those investors on the call and then put the directives out to the management team that: “This is what we have to do to make the numbers for the quarter, otherwise our stock will be hammered.” Endurance Inc. also issues a quarterly press release and conducts an investor conference call, but in addition to the same financial data that Rocket Corp. issued (excluding earnings guidance), they report many additional metrics: Customers: Revenue and market share details   …Continue Reading


The Triple Crown Takes Head and Heart

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Teams that win the Triple Crown of Horseracing exhibit more than just technical skill and “head” smarts. They also possess a certain quality of “heart”. Recruiting, developing, and rewarding personnel for head and heart is the first practice of Triple Crown Leadership. Most organizations focus on knowledge, skills, and experience—“head” issues. Triple crown leaders, by contrast, recruit for those plus personal character, emotional intelligence, passion, and “fit” with the organization’s culture—people with both “head” and “heart.” In honor of the possible Triple Crown victory at the Belmont Stakes this year—which would be the first such win in 36 years—we share an encore presentation of some of our prior reflections on the Triple Crown of Horseracing and the parallel value of head and heart in the pursuit of Triple Crown Leadership.   …Continue Reading