Triple Crown Leadership

Triple Crown Leadership

More Leadership Half-Truths

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Many leaders operate from half-truths or outright misconceptions about leadership. Here are more examples, adding to our prior post, “10 Leadership Myths and Half-Truths.” 

 

False

 

Half-Truth: Leaders Hire the Most Competent People
Yes, leaders hire for competencies and skills, but equally important is to hire and promote people with character, emotional intelligence, and cultural fit. We call it head and heart. Lynn Easterling, Senior Director, Worldwide Operations, Legal Services at Cisco, told us, “I can teach the hard skills, but I can’t teach good character or good relational skills.” 

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffet said, “I look for three things in hiring people. The first is personal integrity, the second is intelligence, and the third is high energy level. But if you don’t have the first, the other two will kill you.” 

Leaders hire for head and heart. 

 

Half-Truth: Leaders Must Have a Vision  
Indeed, leaders must be able to synthesize a vision that inspires people to make deep commitments to their shared endeavor. But the vision should be deeply felt, and perhaps expressed, by all the people. Leaders should elicit a shared vision through a collaborative process.

Leadership authors Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner say, “What people really want to hear is not the leader’s vision. They want to hear about their own aspirations. They want to hear how their dreams will come true and their hopes will be fulfilled. … The very best leaders understand that their key task is inspiring a shared vision.”

Leaders elicit a shared vision.

 

Half-Truth: Leaders Should Be Authentic
Indeed, leaders should understand their personality profile and be authentic. But great leaders know they must also get out of the comfort zone of their personal leadership style at times, flexing between the hard and soft edges of leadership, depending on the circumstances and the people involved. Great leaders never abandon their authenticity or integrity, but they vary their leadership style as necessary.

Leaders flex between the hard and soft edges of leadership, but always anchored to the shared values.

 

Half-Truth: Leaders Demand Technical Excellence from Their People
Technical expertise is only one dimension of what great leaders seek in their colleagues. Great leaders know that a culture of character and high-performance is essential for great endeavors. So, great leaders empower their colleagues through the shared values with a license to lead as stewards of a high-performance culture of character.

Leadership is all about trusteeship.

 

Half-Truth: Leaders Align the Organization to Do What the Leader Wants
This might work if the leader were always right. Unfortunately, leaders are far from perfect. Organizations must be aligned throughout to achieve peak performance, but alignment by edict from the corner office results in compliance without commitment. True alignment is a collaborative effort, a give-and-take of dialogue, listening, explaining, drafting, and redrafting until goals, strategies, and actions plans are clear to all.

Alignment is a collaborative leadership process.

 

What half-truths have sabotaged leadership in your experience?

 

Bob and Gregg Vanourek, father and son, are co-authors of Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations, a 2012 USA Best Business Book Awards finalist.

 

 

 


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